Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean Big Blue Ceramic GMT Replica Watches Hands-On

The Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean Big Blue Ceramic GMT may have one of the most descriptive product names out there – it’s a Planet Ocean that is indeed very big and very blue. And, in truth, it is also quite expensive. Let’s see where your money goes if you get one of these Big, Blue, Beautiful, Expensive things when they become available later in the year.

For lack of a better analogy, I like to look at the Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean Big Blue as a fully spec’ed-out Audi or BMW – it is based on a model range that you can enter at a much lower price point, but this particular specimen has all the latest tech both on the inside and out. While its $10k+ price point very clearly puts it up against some tough competition coming from all sorts of places, there is enough going on here to make me want to review the Seamaster Big Blue soon.

For me, the primary takeaway message I have from this watch after seeing it hands-on at Baselworld 2017 was something along the lines of “I have to see how this blue ceramic fairs in the real world” because, while I have worn ceramic watches before, how this Big Blue watch works on a day-to-day basis is something I want to see for myself. How lastingly interesting, comfortable, quality-exuding, and versatile it is in the mid- to long-run, we’ll only know when Omega starts rolling it out. For now, however, we’ll start on the outside and work our way inwards from there to understand what Omega’s latest and supposedly greatest advancements in case and movement manufacturing can offer.

The most important thing to clarify about the Arabic numerals Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean Big Blue Ceramic GMT replica watches is a certain dissonance between how it looks in images and how it actually is in the real world – you only need to lift it off the watch tray to see for yourself what I’m about to say. Because blue, especially such a saturated, deep blue, we scarcely see quality, durable materials take on, when seeing it in images alone (particularly in official images such as in our release article here) I found myself prone to associating it with a plasticky look and “feel” – though you really can’t make that conclusion from images alone.

That, however, couldn’t be further from the case. Omega watches are very far from being the lightest in the crowd, and the Big Blue is no exception to that rule, thanks to its massive, solid ceramic case and bezel and its also rather generously proportioned automatic movement. In the hand, even upon first impression, the Big Blue feels not only heavy, but also remarkably solid.

Omega did something very cool and brought along a five-piece puzzle to show how the case is crafted from a solid block of ceramic along with a number of other production pieces for the bezel and case-back. Unlike the Chanel J12 and nearly all other ceramic-cased watches, small calendar Omega copy watches do not use a steel inner core with a thin and relatively brittle ceramic layer wrapped around it. Instead, the case is solid ceramic through and through.

It wouldn’t be surprising to learn the technology was coming from Swatch Group sister-brand and ceramic expert Rado, whose HyperChrome ceramic from about five years ago did away with the steel core thanks to its mold-injection ceramic-manufacturing technology. Not a broadly advertised connection, this one, but it would only make sense for Omega to harness the group’s technology and that, fortunately, is exactly what happened.

Both Rado’s HyperChrome and Omega’s ceramic manufacturing process begins with a mold into which “a special zirconium-based powder” is injected. That light blue, large piece you see wrapped in glass in the top left corner of the image above is how the case looks at that stage. It is rather accurately in the case’s final shape, already incorporating all openings for the bracelet, side inserts, as well as the crown and pushers (on applicable case designs). The injected zirconium oxide inside the mold is then subjected to an extremely high pressure of around 1,000 bar and then cooled down and removed from the mold.

At this point, it has shrunk considerably to the size you see in the lower left corner of the image above. Notice how deep blue it has become by the end of this process, indicating that the material itself is colored in its entire depth. It is here where we should note that colored ceramic (and especially in such massive and complex pieces) is extremely rare in watchmaking.
Monochrome ceramics have prevailed in white, black, or tones of grey because the moment you start adding pigments to ceramic and then exposing said pigments multiple times to immense heat (more on that in a bit), they react with the ceramic compound and result in discolorations and inconsistencies on the surface and inside the material itself. More often than not, this results in unacceptable numbers of rejects that are not salvageable but took a lot of effort to produce nevertheless.
As such, the initial high-pressure treatment is followed by a sintering process at 1,450 degrees Celsius (2,642° F), further strengthening and shrinking the material that now even more closely resembles the final shape and is now ever harder and more scratch-resistant.

Omega explains: “for such a tough material, it then takes diamond tools to add the defining edges and grooves while also being lubricated and cooled by high-pressure oil solutions. A three-hour plasma treatment in a 20,000° C furnace then paves the way for precision laser-engraving.”

All this noted, what’s really super impressive is how Omega can finish ceramic which is about five times harder than steel, coming in at around 1,200 Hv on the Vickers scale against 316L and 904L steel’s 180-490 Hv (depending on compound, and heat- and surface treatments, the result varies quite a bit for stainless steel). What you see above is the final case on the left before finishing touches and, on the right, the finished product ready to be assembled. All these wonderful fake watches are good on your daliy as well as your work time. Why not have a try?

Unique And Special Rolex Cellini Moonphase 50535 Replica Watches Hands-On

In my opinion, the most compelling new Rolex watch presented by the Swiss brand at Baselworld 2017 was the Rolex Cellini Moonphase. More than just a new interpretation of an existing design, this is not only a totally new watch, but it also includes a new movement and set of complications which haven’t been part of the Rolex portfolio for at least several decades. To help frame the ‘purpose and poise’ of the white dials Cellini Moonphase copy watches, in Rolex’s words to me this watch is (paraphrasing) “a rare opportunity for the designers at Rolex to artistically express themselves.”Rolex redesigned and re-introduced the Cellini collection of dress watches in 2014. Since then, the brand has launched an almost unprecedented collection of four different movements for the formal watch family. That includes a time-only Rolex Cellini, one with a date dial, the Rolex Cellini Dual Time, and for 2017, the Rolex Cellini Moonphase. For the longest time, Rolex was keen to produce high-quality albeit simple watch movements. The reason for this being that they wanted to reduce possible problems in the movements for consumers while also increasing production efficiency.To a degree, as a more mass-market luxury watchmaker, Rolex understood that mechanical movement complications (other than the time or date) are rarely actually relied upon by wearers. This means that they wanted to focus on modern customers’ needs – and left more niche watch makers to focus on producing more complicated watches for enthusiasts that could be produced in smaller volumes.A moon phase complication, however – especially on a dress watch – is a decidedly emotional complication without too much contemporary practicality. A moon phase indicator is designed to track the roughly 29-day cycle of the moon between its waxing and waning phases. With smartphones and other more useful weather and environmental status-indicating technology, it is a rare case indeed that someone relies upon a mechanical timepiece to be aware of the phases of the moon, let alone have any reason whatsoever to actually need to know this information.

With that said, the moon phase indicator is a beautiful feature integrated into many fine timepieces, and for this reason, we see it a lot in the more niche world of luxury timepieces that market themselves on emotionally driven aesthetics. I must say that I would not have guessed this complication to be of much interest to Rolex, whose aim is to make very high-quality watches that can be sold in relatively high numbers. What I mean to say is that, in my opinion, the brown alligator straps Rolex copy watches are the first decidedly niche Rolex dress watch I’ve ever seen during my lifetime. Further, it appears to be a specific attempt by Rolex to capture attention from other brands which many people assumed Rolex stopped paying attention to long ago.Just one version of the Rolex Cellini Moonphase (the reference 50535) is being introduced for 2017. That means one case material and one dial option – at least as far as I know. Rolex is clearly testing the waters to see how a Rolex-made passion-driven classic dress watch will do. This is about as much effort as Rolex has put into an unsure product in a long time. While not everyone can agree on how successful the 50535 Rolex Cellini Moonphase will be in the market, I think most can agree that the watch is very attractive.Slightly thicker than, say, the time-only Rolex Cellini elegance fake watches – the Rolex Cellini Moonphase case is also 39mm wide and available in 18k Everose gold. The thickness of the classic case combined with the modest case diameter give the watch a pleasant, substantial feel for an otherwise dressy timepiece. Attached to the case is a matching brown alligator strap. I think it would also look good with a black strap, assuming you wanted to match the timepiece to a darker wardrobe of clothing.

Posts Posted on 30th March 2017 Elewgant And Good Taste Longines Record Replica Watches Are Brand’s First COSC-Certified Collection

brand’s 185th anniversary is no small achievement—let’s just make that clear. At Baselworld 2017, Longines marked this occasion by announcing a new collection of simple, Calatrava-styled timepieces known as the Longines Record watches. Aside from offering buyers a choice from four sizes and an assortment of dial options, these watches incorporate a few technical touches to assist with accurate timekeeping. Of considerable note here is the fact that this is the first collection of watches from Longines that have been entirely COSC chronometer-certified.

Before we discuss the movement, however, I think it’s important to appreciate the variety offered in the lineup. To appeal to a broad market segment, Longines is offering the Longines Record watches in case sizes of 26mm, 30mm, 38.5mm, and 40mm. Other options include diamond-set cases on two of the women’s sizes, leather strap or steel bracelet options, and a variety of dial choices like mother-of-pearl, blue sunray, matte white, black lacquer, and more. All of the watches provide 30m of water-resistance and feature blued steel or rhodium-plated hands depending on the dial option along with an AR-coated sapphire crystal as well as an exhibition case back.

As a Swatch Group brand, the Longines Record watches feature exclusively produced ETA-based movements that have been tuned for COSC-certification. Their simple, time-only displays of are driven by the caliber L592.4 in the women’s models and the caliber L888.4 in the men’s models. Though simple in their nature, Longines has also incorporated the use of a crystal-silicon balance spring—a feature that moves these beyond your typical ETA movements. While this isn’t a new development, it’s worth noting that the use of silicon in this capacity helps in the areas of resistance to temperature, shock, and magnetic fields.

Here’s a brief rundown of COSC-certification guidelines if you’re not immediately familiar. After considerable testing, watches must adhere to timekeeping parameters of -4 to +6 seconds of variation per day in a range of positions. While the small calendar  Longines Record watches prove to be a fine choice for this endeavor, I think it will also be exciting to see where and how Longines will utilize these new COSC-certified movements in future releases. Furthermore, the L592.4 and L888.4 movements deliver 40 and 64 hours of power reserve, respectively, and support a simple date indicator at 3 o’clock for convenience in daily wear.

The steel case Longines Record copy watches are a clear sign of the brand’s commitment, not just to movement quality, but growth. The fact that there are so many available options is also a big plus and will only help to support more of a universal appeal for a wide range of prospective buyers.

As I mentioned previously, I’m hopeful that Longines elegant replica watches will continue to expand upon this and incorporate the movements into future models and maybe even some of my existing favorites like the Longines Heritage Military COSD watch.